A recipe for living with cancer.

Posts tagged ‘bat’

Killing an Ant with a Baseball Bat

 

I have finished radiation.  As with most things it dragged the first four weeks and flew by the last two.  The daily routine of getting up and going to the hospital first thing everyday with dread and resolve was quickly replaced with fatigue and painful skin and blisters.  But that too has resolved quickly drying, peeling and now itching much like a nasty sunburn from staying to long at the beach. 

 

I am through the major horrific portion of my cancer treatment and now have what one might call the “clean up” phase– Herceptin infusions to finish out the year and Arimadex for five years- like the clean up hitter in baseball.  Although not the most powerful therapy like the most powerful hitter in baseball, instead of cleaning up the bases, the therapy is meant to clean up any remaining cancer cells left floating around –a very important position in baseball you can win or lose the game, the same for cancer.

 

This is why I’ve questioned all along; is one truly ever cured of cancer?  Am I cured now since visible tumor is physically gone, chemotherapy drugs have coursed through every inch of my body and radiation has burned the local area to a crisp?  Or must I wait until the Herceptin is done and five years of Arimedex has inhibited every bit of estrogen left in my shriveled reproductive organs?  Or am I merely cured until it rears its ugly head again someday down the road when some tiny cells decide its time to divide and reproduce?  This is so random and sporadic it’s like trying to kill an ant with a baseball bat.  You may swing and hit and smash away at the tiny ants and think you’ve gotten them all; you may destroy a huge area where you see no more ants, but you will never get them all.  One or two little buggers dug down deep or were swept away from the initial area of contact…and they may pop up anytime, anywhere.  Cured?

 

There have been many articles of late on breast cancer treatment.  The most recent the New York Times article Our Feel-Good War on Breast Cancer, talking about how in the USA we over treat and are too aggressive with breast cancer, do unnecessary mammograms and in general are killing an ant with a baseball bat.

 

According to this article:

 

Many of those women are told they have something called ductal carcinoma in situ (D.C.I.S.), or “Stage Zero” cancer, in which abnormal cells are found in the lining of the milk-producing ducts. Before universal screening, D.C.I.S. was rare. Now D.C.I.S. and the less common lobular carcinoma in situ account for about a quarter of new breast-cancer cases — some 60,000 a year. In situ cancers are more prevalent among women in their 40s. By 2020, according to the National Institutes of Health’s estimate, more than one million American women will be living with a D.C.I.S. diagnosis.

 

D.C.I.S. survivors are celebrated at pink-ribbon events as triumphs of early detection: theirs was an easily treatable disease with a nearly 100 percent 10-year survival rate. The thing is, in most cases (estimates vary widely between 50 and 80 percent) D.C.I.S. will stay right where it is — “in situ” means “in place.” Unless it develops into invasive cancer, D.C.I.S. lacks the capacity to spread beyond the breast, so it will not become lethal. Autopsies have shown that as many as 14 percent of women who died of something other than breast cancer unknowingly had D.C.I.S.

 

There is as yet no sure way to tell which D.C.I.S. will turn into invasive cancer, so every instance is treated as if it is potentially life-threatening. That needs to change, according to Laura Esserman, director of the Carol Franc Buck Breast Care Center at the University of California, San Francisco. Esserman is campaigning to rename D.C.I.S. by removing its big “C” in an attempt to put it in perspective and tamp down women’s fear. “D.C.I.S. is not cancer,” she explained. “It’s a risk factor. For many D.C.I.S. lesions, there is only a 5 percent chance of invasive cancer developing over 10 years. That’s like the average risk of a 62-year-old. We don’t do heart surgery when someone comes in with high cholesterol. What are we doing to these people?”

 

The key sentence here is:

 

The thing is, in most cases (estimates vary widely between 50 and 80 percent) D.C.I.S. will stay right where it is — “in situ” means “in place.” Unless it develops into invasive cancer, D.C.I.S. lacks the capacity to spread beyond the breast, so it will not become lethal.

 

I have invasive ductal carcinoma, which means my cancer probably started as a D.C.I.S. and developed into invasive cancer, it was not detected until it became invasive.  They cannot tell which D.C.I.S. will turn into invasive cancer, or why but had they found mine10 years ago and removed it, and maybe given me radiation: maybe I wouldn’t have had chemo and maybe I wouldn’t have had four operations, and maybe I wouldn’t have lost my breasts, and maybe I wouldn’t have been exposed to so many CT scans and MRI’s, and maybe I wouldn’t have lost a year and a half of my life and maybe it wouldn’t have cost the health system hundreds of thousands of dollars.  Don’t know about you but if I see an ant and have a tissue handy I’ll kill it, instead of waiting for lots of ants and maybe only have a baseball bat handy.

 

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