A recipe for living with cancer.

Listen More Carefully

Post medical issue Hypochondria is a phenomena associated with any major illness.  Once you have had a heart attack, cancer, major surgery, or any accident you become hyper-aware of your body and it’s idiosyncracies.  Every ache, pain, twinge, pull, itch or mark becomes a major obstacle to be reviewed and examined.  I perseverate over every bump, lump and coloration near, on or around my bilateral mastectomy. Each time I raise my arm the skin pulls and the muscle is tight, but I do not run to the phone and call my PCP, or the oncologist, or radiologist. I wait, look again the next day, stretch a bit more to help the skin  and pass it off as nothing more than normal bodily changes caused by the barrage of therapies my poor body has been put through.  I do sometimes curse the therapies, the cancer and the lack of perfection (not that my body was ever perfect) but on the whole I am a relatively good patient with few anxieties but I do panic when I find a lump, I always have, because it could be breast cancer…and that one time it was.  Herein lies the irony, women are told, listen to your body, you know your body best, when something is not right you will know.  Therefore do I need to stop listening to my body after cancer because it will lie to me, trick me into thinking something is wrong?  Or do I just have to listen more carefully and evaluate more.

I also have the luxury of being married to a physician and if I am really concerned can bring him into the loop and posit the question, do you think this is normal?  And normal is relative of course.  The one area I have been remiss is this tingling in my arm and hand. This has gone on for about 6 weeks now and my personal physician says, get it looked at.

Last week was my final herceptin infusion.  17 infusions starting last July every three weeks.  It is an antibody so there are no side effects, and with my super nurse Barb I never had to worrying about the IV.  She is patient and methodical in choosing her vein, she doesn’t move quickly, remembers veins that have the little valve she got stuck on just once and quickly dispatches the iv and tapes it down.

But I digress, before the infusion I had an appointment with the PA for a checkup.  They do a cursory exam and ask you how things are going.  I mentioned a sore spot and the fact that I have had tingling in my arm and hand.  The PA immediately stopped the exam and sat down in the chair next to me totally exasperated. “Listen,” she said, “patients who have gone through what you have gone through have certain anxieties…”  I tried to stop her and say no, my arm…”no listen,” she interrupted, ” you are going to have anxieties about every little thing associated with your body.  You will think every little thing is a reocurance of your cancer and it is not.  You will worry about things that before you had cancer you would have ignored, and now you will think it is serious.  If something lasts for more than two weeks then you should call and come see us, otherwise don’t worry about it.”  Really?

I should have stopped the PA and told her to listen more carefully to me first, then talk, but I didn’t, I just wanted to get out, get my infusion get done and be DONE.  I will have anxiety forever.  I am not 100% cured, no one is, and that means someday I may find another lump or bump or discoloration, or puckering and I’d better follow-up with it.  And hopefully the person I go to will listen more carefully.

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